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Bail Bondsman Chesterfield VA
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April Letters To and From the Editor

As quickly as ice-covered roads turn into a springy sop, the best sports month comes rushing in. After deflating footballs and the abuse the NFL inflicts, March Madness has a purifying effect. It’s cleansing, inclusive and fair-minded: Sixty-seven teams get a chance to lose to Kentucky, after all.

Scott Bass


As quickly as ice-covered roads turn into a springy sop, the best sports month comes rushing in. After deflating footballs and the abuse the NFL inflicts, March Madness has a purifying effect. It’s cleansing, inclusive and fair-minded: Sixty-seven teams get a chance to lose to Kentucky, after all.

The pros are all about the money and the bling. We root for them until they get called up to the podium on draft day, where expensive cars and Subway ads await. It’s a spectacle that puts on display our gross income inequality in America: In a flash, they ascend from penniless college students to millionaires. It’s the great American dream on steroids.

But for most it isn’t. Watching VCU’s Briante Weber hopping and crying after winning the A-10 championship a few weeks ago, I found myself feeling profoundly guilty. He’s been the face of VCU basketball for two years, one of the reasons we couldn’t wait to tune in and watch. He loves the game, his teammates and his coaches for all the right reasons. This wasn’t about money. Weber blew up his knee in January, which most likely crippled his chances to cash in with an NBA contract.

In reality, college athletes – at least at top-tier programs – sacrifice their bodies, time and futures for next to no compensation. The schools keep the money, the coaches become the celebrities and the athletes – so many of us think – play the game with a semblance of purity. We scorn those who leave college early for the pros, forsaking their education for millions.

What about those who aren’t bound for NBA stardom? The NCAA voted last year to allow universities to pay athletes stipends for living expenses, which is nice. And yes, they do get an education. But how do you focus on your studies when you are practicing and playing more than 40 hours a week? A couple of years ago, an NCAA survey found that football players at top-tier Division 1 schools devoted 43 hours a week to their sport and basketball players more than 39 hours a week. How many 20-year-olds can balance full-time jobs while in college?
Maybe they’ll take that part-time education and turn it into a promising life after sports. Some are lucky to have head coaches – Richmond has two of them – who truly care and support their players. But how long can that really last? What do they do after the lights dim and the madness stops? – Scott Bass

Yes, Love Can Kill


Donna Gregory Burch’s article in the February issue, “When Love Kills,” for me was dead on the mark. I am an 85-year-old male who just lost his wife, love and very best friend of 40 years.

In September of last year, my love died, and I nearly died in December. I had been under a high level of stress and anxiety for some time as I watched my love decline and die from Parkinson’s disease.

The stress impact of a lost love all came due for me when I lay bleeding on the bathroom floor from a massive esophageal hemorrhage. The stress hit the weakest point of my body – I had suffered all my life from achalasia.

I am writing you this letter today only because some primeval instinct impelled me to call 911. Consciously and rationally grief said, “OK, just let’s end it now.”

Thanks to the Henrico Rescue Team and Bon Secours emergency doctors, who did outstanding work getting me back on my feet, I can write you this letter.

Your article is so good it should be in the hands of all those that have to face end-of-life situations. Having lived through it, I can absolutely say if you have loved too long and too well – love can kill.

John H. Neblett
Henrico

Condom story feedback


Rich Griset’s “A Labor of Love” article in the February issue was fascinating. I’ve heard about the Trojan plant before, but his details painted a great picture of one of our best-kept secrets. Thanks for the story and keep up the great work!

Jeb Hoge
Midlothian

The respect that I have had for Chesterfield Monthly has been severely damaged. I was shocked, disgusted and angry to see the cover of the February issue. Do you truly believe it was necessary to announce to every child who enjoys getting the afternoon mail that Chesterfield is the condom capital of the world? Your magazine says condoms are all about love. No, they are not! They are about sex! Sex and love are not synonymous. Did you stop to think that you may be destroying a child’s innocence or undermining a parental decision of when to describe in detail the function of a condom? You have shown a severe lack of discretion and wisdom by publishing articles that are not appropriate for the whole family. Have you no shame?

M.L. Corbett
Chesterfield


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